Sideways and backwards for the Neals A different root to the Norwich line

Other family history researchers with an interest in the same Neal line as Cutlock & Co have identified Henry Neal and Elizabeth Gedge as ancestors, via the couple’s son Robert – they would be our four times great grandparents. Robert is referenced in the marriage record of two times great grandfather Robert Neal (born about 1816, Norwich) as his father, with a trade of ‘printer’.

Trying to firm up this connection, however, hits a barrier in that little else comes up in an online search for Robert senior outside his possible baptism. » Continue reading Sideways and backwards for the Neals A different root to the Norwich line

Expanding the retail experience Or: shop counter intelligence

Over the last year, Cutlock & Co’s editor has been busy facilitating Zoom sessions for the local U3A family history group, plus creating and giving a variety of presentations for them. This website has proved a good source of material, but the creative process also works the other way.

Preparations for a talk titled “The Selling Game” (subtitle “from official establishments to street traders”) was the prompt to explore in more detail the shop work that great uncle George Neal’s bride to be, Beatrice Lake, was doing in 1911. » Continue reading Expanding the retail experience Or: shop counter intelligence

Making the conscientious objectors count Comfort in a dissenting community?

Cyril Pearce, the key expert on ‘Conscience and dissent in Britain during the First World War’, gave a talk on this subject the other day for the Working Class Movement Library.

This is a subject of particular interest in Cutlock towers due to grandfather Sydney Howes’ appearance in the database that Pearce has compiled, as the secretary of the Battersea branch of the No Conscription Fellowship. More about that in the article ‘Piecing together the anti-war evidence‘. » Continue reading Making the conscientious objectors count Comfort in a dissenting community?

Delving into the Osborne gallery More mystery images

Could this photograph be of 3 times great grandmother Mary Ann Osborne, nee Dawe? A fresh batch of interesting old family images have been emerging courtesy of cousin Rob {1}, and this one is particularly intriguing.

Granny Osborne, but which?

The back of the photo is the place to start, with its difficult to decipher writing but also with the printed details ‘Photo by Mayo’s Studio, 7 Paget Road, Barry Island’. Mary Ann (often recorded as just Mary) lived in Misterton with husband Robert but she is already noted as being away from him at times. » Continue reading Delving into the Osborne gallery More mystery images

In tune with the times Music, migration and print

Further research on the O’Brien and Farrall lines {2} has unsurprisingly revealed more relatives to contact via Ancestry or other means. That’s not really worthy of a written note on Cutlock & Co – but perhaps a musical version instead, as one of these relatives has turned his hand to writing songs. A cousin to “uncle Charles”, he has put together an album’s worth set around their common ancestors’ journey from Ireland to London in the 1840s. » Continue reading In tune with the times Music, migration and print

Squaring the circle Connecting from Cummins to Watkins

One of those “It really is a small world” moments – discovering a distant in-law cousin on my dad’s side is connected to a close cousin on mum’s.

Cutlock & Co has been researching the family tree for a second cousin’s spouse for quite a while. Roy’s line goes back to William Cummins, a ‘tide waiter’ (customs officer) and later ‘Chief Collector of Customs’, born 1835 in Portsmouth. William came from a humble background, his mother Jane the housekeeper (and perhaps more) to prosperous tobacco merchant William Cavander in Portsmouth. » Continue reading Squaring the circle Connecting from Cummins to Watkins