Delving into the Osborne gallery More mystery images

Could this photograph be of 3 times great grandmother Mary Ann Osborne, nee Dawe? A fresh batch of interesting old family images have been emerging courtesy of cousin Rob {1}, and this one is particularly intriguing.

Granny Osborne, but which?

The back of the photo is the place to start, with its difficult to decipher writing but also with the printed details ‘Photo by Mayo’s Studio, 7 Paget Road, Barry Island’. Mary Ann (often recorded as just Mary) lived in Misterton with husband Robert but she is already noted as being away from him at times. » Continue reading Delving into the Osborne gallery More mystery images

More than a musical footnote Joe Gregory, popular accordionist and band leader

Joe Gregory’s name crops up online from time to time, usually as a mention in the history of “the oldest record shop” Spillers Records in Cardiff. An album launch by big name rock band The Pixies at the shop got it (and Joe) page 3 attention in The Guardian (14th September print edition) {1}.

There’s not much on the web about Joe, accordionist and band leader originally from Bush Houses, Tonypandy and a first cousin twice removed, so here’s a start at collating what is out there and adding to it. » Continue reading More than a musical footnote Joe Gregory, popular accordionist and band leader

Meeting a younger Millie Even great grans were youthful once

The fascinating family photos keep on emerging. This time third cousin Alan Croad has found two photos which were in the same style as an earlier discovery for ‘Uncle Bill’ Osborne.

One was labelled “aunt Millie”, a name that great gran Amelia Osborne was known by. Born 1878, married late 1895, is this about the time of the wedding perhaps? Or a year or two later?

Without that label you would struggle to be certain that this young person matches images of Amelia much later in life. » Continue reading Meeting a younger Millie Even great grans were youthful once

First World War Details and round-up of family involvement

There are various articles on Cutlock & Co covering 1914 to 1918 family experiences. These are linked below, along with some further information.

Note that only about 40% of World War One army service records survive. Medal records can give some minimal info, if the name isn’t too common -otherwise look out for local press coverage of casualties or other events.

Concerning close relations

 » Continue reading First World War Details and round-up of family involvement

Blaengwynfi and beyond Osbornes spreading out in the valleys

A guest article from Alan Croad {1}.

A number of factors may explain the movement of the wider Osborne family between Clydach Vale, Blaengwynfi and Tonyrefail. {2}

Developing the pits

An important entrepreneur William Perch 1831-1891 of Perch & Co. opened mines in the Rhondda Valley, including one at Clydach Vale in 1847 and later in the Afan Valley in 1892; he later acquired the Glyncorrwg and Glynneath mines. Perch’s success included obtaining Admiralty contracts in 1898 supplying coal to the Navy. » Continue reading Blaengwynfi and beyond Osbornes spreading out in the valleys

Squeals of delight The wheeling dealing Osbornes

Another delightful occupational title has come to light, after a little gap filling and “new” records checking on the family tree {1}. Previously I had somehow identified 4x great grandfather Joseph Osborne as a (farm) labourer, supposedly per his son Robert’s marriage registration {5}. However, on making use of Ancestry’s Somerset collection, the original image for this event shows him to be a ‘Pig Jobber’!

As defined by a list of old occupations {2}, this is someone who “Bought pigs and then sold them off for profit”. » Continue reading Squeals of delight The wheeling dealing Osbornes