Blaengwynfi and beyond Osbornes spreading out in the valleys

A guest article from Alan Croad {1}.

A number of factors may explain the movement of the wider Osborne family between Clydach Vale, Blaengwynfi and Tonyrefail. {2}

Developing the pits

An important entrepreneur William Perch 1831-1891 of Perch & Co. opened mines in the Rhondda Valley, including one at Clydach Vale in 1847 and later in the Afan Valley in 1892; he later acquired the Glyncorrwg and Glynneath mines. Perch’s success included obtaining Admiralty contracts in 1898 supplying coal to the Navy. » Continue reading Blaengwynfi and beyond Osbornes spreading out in the valleys

The 1939 Bush Houses bulletin A dwindling, but similar, population

Having coughed up for a Findmypast annual sub to access the 1939 Register details {4}, it is time for Cutlock & Co to do its usual job, as per earlier censuses, transcribing the whole information for Bush Houses {see notes 1, 2}.

The Cutlock Transcription

Information on all households is shown on the Bush Houses 1939 spreadsheet, and here’s a pdf version, for those who don’t like spreadsheets. Out of 281 entries (individuals) a hundred were ‘locked’ (unavailable to view) when first processed – another 22 are open at November 2016. » Continue reading The 1939 Bush Houses bulletin A dwindling, but similar, population

An array of Osbornes Knocking down a wall to see the wider picture

Up until the beginning of this month (April 2016), two of great grandmother Amelia Osborne’s siblings had proved elusive, despite looking for several years. The brick wall has well and truly been smashed through thanks to third cousin Alan Croad, for one of the two at least.

Elizabeth Osborne, the middle child of the family, married Fred Tucker in Neath district, rather than the expected Pontypridd, in 1899. With this cracked, it is easy to find her in 1901 and 1911 census, both times living near to sister Ellen and her Woodland crew in Blaengwynfi {1}. » Continue reading An array of Osbornes Knocking down a wall to see the wider picture

Calling Clare Harris!

Cutlock & Co received your message earlier today, on the old Bush House church – the tin shed. Thanks! However it looks like there was an error in your email address, so the reply bounced.

Did you spot the small black and white photo of ‘Bush Chapel’ at the bottom of the Bush Houses viewpoints article? I think this must match your tin shed, as the place the Gregory family had close involvement. » Continue reading “Calling Clare Harris!”

External link to Remembering the price of coal

Remembering the price of coal

Sunday 17th May is the 50th anniversary of the last deep coal mining disaster in South Wales, at Cambrian Colliery, Clydach Vale.

Rob Osborne, a third cousin once removed, grew up close to where the mine had been. He reports for ITV News Wales in ‘Remembering the Cambrian Colliery disaster 50 years on‘ – old news footage as well as new.

Note Immediate family had long left the area by 1965.

Putting all the Levis in order Another tale of Welsh miners in America

The idea of one, or more, Watkins ancestors being born in America was tackled a while back, in ‘Cracking a family myth‘. Now another possible source of the tale has emerged, through a family tree on Ancestry.

The original story as recounted by cousin Islwyn was about the father of John Watkins, namely my 2x great grandfather Levy. Or Levi – I use the alternative spelling as a way to reduce confusion with my grandfather of the same name. » Continue reading Putting all the Levis in order Another tale of Welsh miners in America