Expanding the retail experience Or: shop counter intelligence

Over the last year, Cutlock & Co’s editor has been busy facilitating Zoom sessions for the local U3A family history group, plus creating and giving a variety of presentations for them. This website has proved a good source of material, but the creative process also works the other way.

Preparations for a talk titled “The Selling Game” (subtitle “from official establishments to street traders”) was the prompt to explore in more detail the shop work that great uncle George Neal’s bride to be, Beatrice Lake, was doing in 1911. » Continue reading Expanding the retail experience Or: shop counter intelligence

A right Frosdick family for the Barnard bunch Some quite interesting Ancestry hints

Since August I have been slowly clearing a backlog of ‘hints’ generated by the Ancestry site for the HowesWatkinsNealScott tree. These can be useful in pointing up records previously overlooked in researching an individual, but there are also plenty of duff leads and repeats of info already collected. New hints tend to appear in batches and it can be hard to keep up – with an accumulated total of just shy of 16,000 it was getting out of hand! » Continue reading A right Frosdick family for the Barnard bunch Some quite interesting Ancestry hints

The changing face of work Electric job generation

The changing lines of work, along with developments in technology and society, come through clearly in searches on the September 1939 register {1}. Of course, many others continue to be employed in more traditional jobs of shop keeper, coal miner, metal worker, gardener, insurance agent, teacher, printer etc. {4}

Some examples below, but this piece starts off with an oddity or two.

Much call for this line of work?

As already illustrated in Pitching for a job, occupation descriptions can be remarkably obscure to modern eyes. » Continue reading The changing face of work Electric job generation

Not taking a hint on Griffith Watkins Highs and lows in a Rhondda life

Taken separately, none of the information in this piece is exceptionally noteworthy, but together perhaps there is enough for passing interest.

This little session kicked off with one of Ancestry’s “new hints” email notifications – usually highlighting irrelevant items or ones I’d checked out a day or two before. This time, it included a 1911 Wales census hint for Griffith Watkins, a great great uncle {1}. While this did indeed prove to be a hint to ignore, it prompted me to see if the missing record could now be found in the Ancestry system. » Continue reading Not taking a hint on Griffith Watkins Highs and lows in a Rhondda life

How to Brake the records

Here is a good illustration of how being open to inquiries on family history can pay dividends. A comment on The Tonypandy that Mum knew article gave some information on a family in that town, living just round the corner from our crew in the early 1900s. A long shot, but could Cutlock and Co come up with any pointers? No harm in seeing if the focus of attention (Florence M Reed) was easy to find in the 1911 census and yes a match came up on an Ancestry search straight away. » Continue reading “How to Brake the records”

Hanging by a thread Discovering the Smith family

Discovering more about the Smith part of the family tree has proved remarkably easy, after having put off looking for ages due to the very common surname.

See Entirely to the Water from Birth for first stages.

Now it was time to find great great grandmother Harriet Smith’s siblings and their immediate offspring. The practice of using the mother’s (or grandmother’s) surname as a middle name was very helpful –jane bacchus smith baptism1818_crop Bacchus for two of the girls, Harper (the grandmother’s name) for one of the boys. » Continue reading Hanging by a thread Discovering the Smith family