Picturing the moving home front A London to and fro in WW2

The second world war was a time of upheaval for many, and this was particularly true for Cutlock & Co’s family lines. It became obvious when going through a collection of old postcards and photographs that there was a story to be told visually. Mum and Dad’s notes help to stitch them together.

Out of London

Being born in 1926, Dad (Arthur) was well into his grammar school life when war broke out and disrupted things. » Continue reading Picturing the moving home front A London to and fro in WW2

Meeting a younger Millie Even great grans were youthful once

The fascinating family photos keep on emerging. This time third cousin Alan Croad has found two photos which were in the same style as an earlier discovery for ‘Uncle Bill’ Osborne.

One was labelled “aunt Millie”, a name that great gran Amelia Osborne was known by. Born 1878, married late 1895, is this about the time of the wedding perhaps? Or a year or two later?

Without that label you would struggle to be certain that this young person matches images of Amelia much later in life. » Continue reading Meeting a younger Millie Even great grans were youthful once

Islwyn’s picture puzzles Rediscovering negatives from the fifties

In this article, more a side view on Islwyn Watkins’ art student days (late 1950s) {2} than deep family history. Fellow student Ed Beavis found some photographic negatives taken by Islwyn which had been tucked away, from a trip of theirs which included dropping in on relations. Most likely around/south of Bristol.

Which family?

These don’t seem to be Watkins faces, so are more likely to be his mother’s Hickman side. Do any of these faces look familiar to anyone? » Continue reading Islwyn’s picture puzzles Rediscovering negatives from the fifties

An array of Osbornes Knocking down a wall to see the wider picture

Up until the beginning of this month (April 2016), two of great grandmother Amelia Osborne’s siblings had proved elusive, despite looking for several years. The brick wall has well and truly been smashed through thanks to third cousin Alan Croad, for one of the two at least.

Elizabeth Osborne, the middle child of the family, married Fred Tucker in Neath district, rather than the expected Pontypridd, in 1899. With this cracked, it is easy to find her in 1901 and 1911 census, both times living near to sister Ellen and her Woodland crew in Blaengwynfi {1}. » Continue reading An array of Osbornes Knocking down a wall to see the wider picture

Bush Houses viewpoints Cwm Clydach Cottages in colour and b&w

Cutlock & Co is extremely grateful to a new contact who has forwarded some photos of Bush Houses. One view was familiar, from the painting which appears at the bottom of Feeling Bushed and also a poor quality version received via another source, but the older black and white image was certainly from a fresh perspective.

Looking down the valley towards Tonypandy, with the main part of Clydach Vale /Blaen Clydach to the left (north), St Albans church can be seen on the bottom left. » Continue reading Bush Houses viewpoints Cwm Clydach Cottages in colour and b&w

Our American pioneers

The Watts family members migrating to Nebraska in the late 19th century were hardly in the first wave of American immigrants, but were still pioneers in the area they settled – Seward county. They are also the first known members of the wider family to have travelled that far {1}.

Robert and Jane Jeary

This photograph, kindly supplied by third cousin Peggy Stahr, is of Robert Jeary and wife Jane (nee Watts). Jane was the oldest child of Matthew and Ann Watts, born 1846 in Worstead, Norfolk. » Continue reading “Our American pioneers”