First World War Details and round-up of family involvement

There are various articles on Cutlock & Co covering 1914 to 1918 family experiences. These are linked below, along with some further information.

Note that only about 40% of World War One army service records survive. Medal records can give some minimal info, if the name isn’t too common -otherwise look out for local press coverage of casualties or other events.

Concerning close relations

 » Continue reading First World War Details and round-up of family involvement

Pitching for a job Work is unclear, but wedding photo sorted

September 1939 is not so far away as to think that a work description, certainly one for an English job, could be difficult to understand. But what exactly might be involved in being a ‘Trinidad Pitch Pourer’, as seen in this 1939 register extract?

roberts1939_pitchpourer

After a little digging on Wikipedia, Trinidad Pitch must be the product of Pitch Lake in Trinidad {1} – the largest natural deposit of asphalt in the world. But was John H Roberts pouring it to make road surfaces, perhaps for roofing, to caulk boats, or what? » Continue reading Pitching for a job Work is unclear, but wedding photo sorted

A proud pit fireman A hundred year old certificate

The archive of old photos on the Howes side of the family has now passed in to my possession. This will allow more scans, filling in gaps from the 2011 exercise {1}. There are also a few snaps on the Watkins side that were in a separate bundle or mixed up in other papers.

Here’s a partial image of probably the largest item in the whole collection – 16½ by 20 inches {2}. » Continue reading A proud pit fireman A hundred year old certificate

Putting all the Levis in order Another tale of Welsh miners in America

The idea of one, or more, Watkins ancestors being born in America was tackled a while back, in ‘Cracking a family myth‘. Now another possible source of the tale has emerged, through a family tree on Ancestry.

The original story as recounted by cousin Islwyn was about the father of John Watkins, namely my 2x great grandfather Levy. Or Levi – I use the alternative spelling as a way to reduce confusion with my grandfather of the same name. » Continue reading Putting all the Levis in order Another tale of Welsh miners in America

Not taking a hint on Griffith Watkins Highs and lows in a Rhondda life

Taken separately, none of the information in this piece is exceptionally noteworthy, but together perhaps there is enough for passing interest.

This little session kicked off with one of Ancestry’s “new hints” email notifications – usually highlighting irrelevant items or ones I’d checked out a day or two before. This time, it included a 1911 Wales census hint for Griffith Watkins, a great great uncle {1}. While this did indeed prove to be a hint to ignore, it prompted me to see if the missing record could now be found in the Ancestry system. » Continue reading Not taking a hint on Griffith Watkins Highs and lows in a Rhondda life

Finding a Reason for this solicitor

Here’s an intriguing new little puzzle. Ancestry.co.uk’s hints feature, suggesting records and other trees connected with an individual in your own tree, is highly variable in its usefulness and has come up with very little for most of this year. Yesterday it threw up a couple of hints on the Welsh side – the Hughes and Rees lines, which often seem a lost cause in research with such common names.

The 1922 probate calendar record for great great grandmother Mary Hughes, nee Rees, must be hers, as the address is 13 Francis Street, Skewen, where she had been since at least 1891. » Continue reading “Finding a Reason for this solicitor”