Rogue elements in Uncle Arthur’s past A marriage that was never mentioned

‘Uncle Arthur’ was known as a “bit of a rogue” in relation to women, according to Dad. There wasn’t anything much to back this up other than he, Arthur William Howes, seemingly didn’t marry until age 50 {1}, and other relations mentioning wandering hands. Although his name came up occasionally, I didn’t form any impression of him as a child, and if we ever visited uncle Arthur and ‘aunt Bill’ in Ipswich I don’t remember it. » Continue reading Rogue elements in Uncle Arthur’s past A marriage that was never mentioned

Back on the trail with Bertram Another Scott relation found on military service

A nephew of great granddad Charles Scott made his way to Oz in 1912, returning to Europe with the Australian army a few years later.

On the trail

As highlighted some time ago in ‘A Major breakthrough in the Scott line‘, some of great grandfather Charles Vickery Scott’s siblings have been rather hard to track down. This time, I skipped a generation and looked at why nephew Bertram had disappeared after 1911 {2} – with his mother’s last appearance being his 1890 Seavington baptism record! » Continue reading Back on the trail with Bertram Another Scott relation found on military service

Meeting a younger Millie Even great grans were youthful once

The fascinating family photos keep on emerging. This time third cousin Alan Croad has found two photos which were in the same style as an earlier discovery for ‘Uncle Bill’ Osborne.

One was labelled “aunt Millie”, a name that great gran Amelia Osborne was known by. Born 1878, married late 1895, is this about the time of the wedding perhaps? Or a year or two later?

Without that label you would struggle to be certain that this young person matches images of Amelia much later in life. » Continue reading Meeting a younger Millie Even great grans were youthful once

Islwyn’s picture puzzles Rediscovering negatives from the fifties

In this article, more a side view on Islwyn Watkins’ art student days (late 1950s) {2} than deep family history. Fellow student Ed Beavis found some photographic negatives taken by Islwyn which had been tucked away, from a trip of theirs which included dropping in on relations. Most likely around/south of Bristol.

Which family?

These don’t seem to be Watkins faces, so are more likely to be his mother’s Hickman side. Do any of these faces look familiar to anyone? » Continue reading Islwyn’s picture puzzles Rediscovering negatives from the fifties

Political shocks ruin the inventing business Glass and electrical innovator crushed by patriotic efforts

It’s not often that you find records concerning a (distant) relative that have been locked away by the state for a hundred years. And even more notable when the story that is uncovered includes political intrigue, Ireland’s fight for independence and a major change in circumstances for said relation.

The story is a little tricky to tell, requiring some political background and a careful selection from the pages of material available, while not losing sight of the family history in the flood of details. » Continue reading Political shocks ruin the inventing business Glass and electrical innovator crushed by patriotic efforts

The Jearys in sundry Seward stories More Nebraskan nitty gritty

This piece delves wider and deeper into local news items not-so-newly available online for Seward, Nebraska, as described in the Cutlock & Co piece Local papers for local people (March 2017). That looked at a family reunion, one listing of local family visits and an obituary.

Differing aspects of Jeary pioneers

In a simple search for Jeary in Nebraska, press cuttings for brother Edwin, a state senator and prominent person, tend to drown out Robert Jeary. » Continue reading The Jearys in sundry Seward stories More Nebraskan nitty gritty