More than a musical footnote Joe Gregory, popular accordionist and band leader

Joe Gregory’s name crops up online from time to time, usually as a mention in the history of “the oldest record shop” Spillers Records in Cardiff. An album launch by big name rock band The Pixies at the shop got it (and Joe) page 3 attention in The Guardian (14th September print edition) {1}.

There’s not much on the web about Joe, accordionist and band leader originally from Bush Houses, Tonypandy and a first cousin twice removed, so here’s a start at collating what is out there and adding to it. » Continue reading More than a musical footnote Joe Gregory, popular accordionist and band leader

An array of Osbornes Knocking down a wall to see the wider picture

Up until the beginning of this month (April 2016), two of great grandmother Amelia Osborne’s siblings had proved elusive, despite looking for several years. The brick wall has well and truly been smashed through thanks to third cousin Alan Croad, for one of the two at least.

Elizabeth Osborne, the middle child of the family, married Fred Tucker in Neath district, rather than the expected Pontypridd, in 1899. With this cracked, it is easy to find her in 1901 and 1911 census, both times living near to sister Ellen and her Woodland crew in Blaengwynfi {1}. » Continue reading An array of Osbornes Knocking down a wall to see the wider picture

The interconnectedness of Tonypandy Osbornes

Another illustration of how inter-connected the Osborne family was/is in the Tonypandy area emerged recently.

For Matilda Osborne, born about 1884 in Misterton to Levi (brother of 2x great grandfather William) and wife Elizabeth, the finished 1911 census records on Ancestry had been awaited to put more flesh on her husband and their children. Annoyingly it is still not clear whether his name is Edwin or Edward Sheldon, but it seems likely that he went by Edward in life, but was born and died as Edwin. » Continue reading “The interconnectedness of Tonypandy Osbornes”

A community in the Bush

… is worth two in Malvern. Or some other bad variation on the saying – any better suggestions?

This is the second article featuring the ‘street’ known as Bush Houses, this time trying to give an idea of how it featured in the the lives of the families who had moved from south Somerset to the south Wales valleys of the Rhondda. See the previous post for the physical history of the place. » Continue reading “A community in the Bush”