Making the conscientious objectors count Comfort in a dissenting community?

Cyril Pearce, the key expert on ‘Conscience and dissent in Britain during the First World War’, gave a talk on this subject the other day for the Working Class Movement Library.

This is a subject of particular interest in Cutlock towers due to grandfather Sydney Howes’ appearance in the database that Pearce has compiled, as the secretary of the Battersea branch of the No Conscription Fellowship. More about that in the article ‘Piecing together the anti-war evidence‘. » Continue reading Making the conscientious objectors count Comfort in a dissenting community?

Besthorpe Howes family roots

Besthorpe is the ancestral home of the Howes family. The line can be traced to this village/parish south west of Norwich, potentially as far back as the 15th century.

See Bottling it in Besthorpe for more about family connections to the area, and specific places such as The Carr, Bottle House, with census descriptions 1841-71 and map extracts for these.

Historic documents

“Besthorpe Terrier”, Bishops Visitation 1729

The Besthorpe parish register from 1729 has as its first couple of pages ‘A copy of the Besthorpe Terrier exhibited at the Bishops Visitation 14th day of June 1729’. » Continue reading Besthorpe Howes family roots

Bottling it in Besthorpe Giving the Howes line a home

Of all the ancestral home towns and villages, that of the direct Howes line, namely Besthorpe in Norfolk, has been the most neglected to date. This stands alongside the minimal details held on the last known family member to spend all his life there, 3x great grandfather James Howes. The direct line can be quite easily traced back to him, born in the village at the turn of the 19th century {1}. » Continue reading Bottling it in Besthorpe Giving the Howes line a home

Newspapers ablaze with minor family insights Passing educational references, and an indepth story

After some time without, getting access to the British Newspaper Archive – part of a (half price) FindMyPast Pro subscription – raises the dilemma of where to start researching. Perhaps firstly with those individuals in the tree most likely to appear in the news, and then close relatives to see if any notices, in the absence of news items, might add another angle.

The approach has already led to shining some contrasting light on youthful grandparents plus an interesting incident not of any great relevance to the family tree. » Continue reading Newspapers ablaze with minor family insights Passing educational references, and an indepth story

Picturing the moving home front A London to and fro in WW2

The second world war was a time of upheaval for many, and this was particularly true for Cutlock & Co’s family lines. It became obvious when going through a collection of old postcards and photographs that there was a story to be told visually. Mum and Dad’s notes help to stitch them together.

Out of London

Being born in 1926, Dad (Arthur) was well into his grammar school life when war broke out and disrupted things. » Continue reading Picturing the moving home front A London to and fro in WW2

Rogue elements in Uncle Arthur’s past A marriage that was never mentioned

‘Uncle Arthur’ was known as a “bit of a rogue” in relation to women, according to Dad. There wasn’t anything much to back this up other than he, Arthur William Howes, seemingly didn’t marry until age 50 {1}, and other relations mentioning wandering hands. Although his name came up occasionally, I didn’t form any impression of him as a child, and if we ever visited uncle Arthur and ‘aunt Bill’ in Ipswich I don’t remember it. » Continue reading Rogue elements in Uncle Arthur’s past A marriage that was never mentioned